Friday, February 21, 2014

If you claim you've never been arrested on your job application, how do you explain this?


We left off a few days ago discussing a police detective who claimed that he had never been "arrested, convicted, or plead no contest to any violations of the law, police regulation, ordinance, traffic violations which resulted in fines or(sic) of more than $100.00" on his job application for the police department where he's currently employed.  We also raised the issue of the detectives integrity being compromised because of his dishonesty on his job application.  Since we made that post, our readers have been running wild in our comments section with all sorts of different comments ranging from arguing about the legality marijuana to allegations of the subjects of my recent posts being some sort of vendetta.  Whatever.

With that said, it's time to take a look a the police report from the incident that the detective forgot to mention on his job application, take a look and as always, click on the image to enlarge...


So from what we're able to glean from the report, the subject gets pulled over for some sort of improper exhaust on his car, the officer pulls the guy over then asks him for his drivers license and registration at which time he pulls out a black zippered bag and starts looking through it for his registration.  While he was doing so, the officer spotted a vial with some cocaine in it then decides to arrest the subject.  It gets better, once the officer starts searching through the bag, he finds some "job cigarette papers" aka "rolling papers" and a altered drivers license where the date of birth was changed from 1967 to 1963 which coincidentally would have made the subject 23 years old instead of 19, IE the perfect fake id to use to buy alcohol.  At the end of the day, the subject was then transported the the Dade County Jail where he invariably spent several hours in a holding cell after being booked.

The question that begs to be asked though, is considering how traumatic this experience must have been and the impact it must have left on the subject, how could he have forgotten all about it when it came time to fill out his employment application for a job as a police officer?


We're going to dig deeper into this story next week, in the interim, for all our readers that have been going on and on about marijuana and who's smoking and who's a pot head etc, please tell us, what exactly were those rolling papers found in the subjects vehicle used for?


15 comments:

  1. He needed to save money so instead of buying Marlboro he bought Bugler, but the papers he got with the Bugler tobacco got wet so he bough a pack of papers at a head shop.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Saving money for booze & cocaine?

    ReplyDelete
  3. SMPD sued again, city to pay $25,000 to lawyer to defend

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ex-cop suing for not getting paid for the time he spent getting dressed. Normally this would be considered a nuisance suit - but if he wins, suddenly every uniformed professional in Florida, from firefighter to dog-catcher, can make the same claim.

      Delete
  4. This is typical in the city. The Mayor may make it sound like everything is peachy with Rene Landa as the new chief but the true facts is that the police are not happy, and no amount of words by the Mayor and his co-conspirators, Edmond, Welsh, Harris, and Alexander can make the truth go away. The police in the city can't stand Stoddard are his buds and that won't change. Chief Stoddard got a new badge as the new chief but is not showing it publicly. Now we have Mayor Stoddard, City Manager Stoddard, Chief Stoddard, Planner Stoddard, and no matter the amount of titles, what you really have is a serious sick individual. The law suit you are speak of is yet just another police officer suing the city, not the one originally mentioned in this blog. I know it is very difficult to keep up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Fish has spoken.

      Delete
    2. You forgot Code Enforcement Officer Stoddard. Stoddard waves his magic wand and the new Chinese restaurant opens downtown with virtually no oversight by the City. This is work of Mayor, Chief, City Manager, Planner, and Code Enforcement Officer Stoddard, and his trusted sidekicks, the Dovers.

      Delete
  5. So how many officers called Stedman Stahl and told him they did not want the PBA endorsing Newman, Feliu and Shelley.....like about 19???

    ReplyDelete
  6. speaks volumes about the city's Method of Operation.

    "Weissberg became a police officer in 1997.
    “I was Officer of the Year three different times in three different organizations,” Weissberg said. “I received the chief’s award from the city of South Miami. I’m not a slacker. I’m not a complainer or somebody who couldn’t hack it. It’s unfortunate that because of the way I was treated, I had to walk out of there and file a lawsuit.
    “In the end it got to the point where I could just let them keep going the way they were going without taking a stand,” Weissberg said. “It bothers me that I had to walk away from my job. They (the city of south miami management) HAVE DECIDED THAT THEY DON'T HAVE TO FOLLOW THE LAW." - http://www.miamiherald.com/2014/02/25/v-print/3959465/ex-south-miami-cop-says-city-failed.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He says the "city broke the law". what law is that? that the city needs to pay for a police man getting dressed at home, before coming to work? what's next? how about the time he spent in the bathroom before he came to work? or the time he had breakfast before coming to work? he should fire his attorney, they are both stupid.

      Delete
    2. Can't mess with the FEDS remember the IRS payment?
      FLSA
      The most common police FLSA overtime claims involve "off-the-clock" work. The following activities may be compensable when performed during "off-the-clock" time: Care and maintenance of police equipment (e.g., police dogs, vehicles, guns, uniforms), work performed before or after regular shifts, police-related paperwork and telephone calls, working through meal periods, training time (to the extent such hours are not included in regular pay).
      Other police FLSA overtime cases have involved employers' computing FLSA overtime rates improperly by not factoring in "wage augments" such as longevity pay or shift differentials, or when employers have improperly classified officers as exempt employees.
      Liquidated damages and attorneys' fees are available to police officers under the FLSA.

      Delete
  7. As far as comment as to how many police officers called Steadman regarding an endorsement, they are all whores, kissing ass to whoever is chief at the time. I guess it was Stoddard they are kissing now. Under Stoddard's leadership there will be more lawsuits like this because his puppet Pepe the city attorney can't handle driving out of his parking space at City Hall much less handle any type of lawsuit the city has. Pepe is as incompetent as his bosses and his social friends, Welsh, Harris, Harris's wife, and of course the Professor and his wife. By the way, I heard the police officer who is now suing the city for money while he dresses also had a part time job delivering information regarding whatever at the police department to Stoddard, Welsh, and Harris, and is also a professor at FIU, and than what happens, the police officers quits and sues. Sounds like the police officer is not giving the whole story perhaps the ex officer has something on Stoddard, Welsh, and Harris.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Fish has spoken again. A talking fish is worth a lot of money, but one that can type on a smart phone can make a living as a fiction writer instead of lolling around on the taxpayer's dime pretending to be a cop.

      Delete
  8. Come on Mayor Stoddard, don't you have better things to do than respond to a blog? Hurry up lacky, you need to appease your special interests all the ones on your campaign treasury reports as well as the pacs like Oscar Sol from Madison Square, Williamson Cadillac to name a few. Have you thought of what your next platform is going to be, FPL is getting pretty old and the few people that came out to vote are starting to question. BTW, Mayor Stoddard, please change the name of this blog to what it originally was to be named but you didn't want anyone to think that you are as devious as you are. Kindly change the name to the Phil Stoddard Blog. Everyone knows you control Mike and tell him what to do.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Small claims court can be a cost-effective means of resolving a civil dispute where the amount in controversy is under a certain dollar amount (as specified in the rules of court). Small claims cases do not require, and in some jurisdictions may not even allow, representation of parties by attorneys.
    claims pages

    ReplyDelete